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  #1  
Old 06-21-2000, 07:08 AM
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This past Saturday I pulled the cover off the front of my Xplorer to "rewire" the override button. After I tracked down the correct wires I went out to find the 12v 20 amp diode for the operation.

Well . . . I went to 3 auto parts stores (did not carry them), 1 electronics store (looked at me weird and said the largest they have is a 12v 1 watt), Radio Shack (same response as the electronics store) and an alternator/starter repair shop (looked at me weird, showed me one that looked like an oversized watch battery with prong sticking out one side, and would not sell it to me)

The places that did carry diodes were measured in watts not amps. I no nadda about electronics, are they they same or totally different? Is there any way to convert watts to amps?

And the big question . . . any ideas where I can get a diode.
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  #2  
Old 06-21-2000, 09:08 AM
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a 20 AMp diode seem a bit hefty for any vehicular application.. That would make it 240 watts! My guess is it is for isolation? Trying to keep something from turning on?lights?
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  #3  
Old 06-21-2000, 09:18 AM
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This is just a guess, but I believe the 12 volts must refer to the back limit on voltage. Diodes pass current in one direction and block in the opposite direction. The 20 amps must refer to the maximum forward current. So, "Loyal", I believe it is incorrect to multiply current (20 amps) by the back voltage (12 volts) to get the power rating, as these are mutually exclusive directions. If the diode was a "Zener" type, then the "back" voltage acts as a voltage limiter, but these are usually small devices used as a reference for a regulator. I don't know how the 12volt, 20 amp specification was determined; was it stamped on the diode?
Hope this helps some. Just my 4 cents, of course.
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  #4  
Old 06-21-2000, 10:40 AM
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You could probably find one where they sell parts for Ham Radio applications. (linear amplifiers)
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  #5  
Old 06-21-2000, 11:07 AM
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Loyal, are you modifying your system, or merely restoring it to stock configuration? If you're modifying it, the "from" to "to" remains unknown, along with the function and purpose of the diode you seek. If you're restoring it, Polaris should catalog the part, I would think.

Tree Farmer
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  #6  
Old 06-21-2000, 11:11 AM
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The 12 volts I assume is the forward biased direction. THe reverse direction would have to be greater seeing it is used in a 12 volt system. Current rating assumes forward bias and is the worst case scenerio. Components should not be operated in this range.
I assume the diode is being used to block voltage to something that is not desired to be turned on by way of the override switch. I remember something about the reverse light on the dashboard coming on if the modification was installed. If this is the correct application, a small general purpose diode would suffice.
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  #7  
Old 06-21-2000, 12:09 PM
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What I'm attempting to do is to disengage the override button so that I have full power AND 4x4 in reverse without pressing the yellow button. I have to cut a spedo wire and connect two others (I don't have the exact wire colours with me now, my printoff is home)

Tim C - Without the diode the reverse light will be on at all times. The diode will only allow current to flow in one direction and allow the reverse light to act normally. Will the 12v 1watt be heayy enough?

Expeditioneer - the 12v 20amp diode was suggested by the individual who posted the process.

Thor - I will take a look

Tree Farmer - I am modifying my bike. See above.

Thanks for the replys. From your comments it seems as if the 12v 20amp diode may be a little heavy. Additional advise is welcome.
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  #8  
Old 06-21-2000, 12:23 PM
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A 1n4001 is a general purpose diode rate at 1 amp. This should suffice for your application. They are as common as dirt.. radio shack should have them. A 1n5408 is rated at 3 amps. I like to go a little on the heavy side. It's a little bigger phisically too. Either one should work.
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  #9  
Old 06-21-2000, 01:07 PM
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Loyal,

As the others have indicated, forget the 20 amp diode. It will be huge and it is way overkill.

Here is a portion of a post I made a while back on the headlight mod. I know you are doing the reverse switch mod. For that mod use just one 3 amp diode. It will do fine and be nice and small too. If possible use a "Shottky Barrier" diode (as specified below) to minimize losses. The diode will run cooler. Not mandatory, but better, and still dirt cheap.

I got the diodes at Future (Active) Electronics here in Ottawa. They should be available at just about any electronics shop. Not surprised you couldn't find the 20 amp ones!!

Here is the post:

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For the headlight mod ...

I have used this method on a few of the machines in our riding group. It originated here in the forum and works well.

I have tried the method hawk045 mentioned (sitting the switch half way betwen high and low). On my machine it worked fine until I hit a bump!

Remove the front rack (4 screws) and pop the hood off. Locate the solid green and yellow wires coming down the handlebars from the headlight switch. Strip a short portion of each wire (1/4"). Attach a diode between the two wires, with the cathode (line on the diode) end of the diode towards the green wire. Solder the connections and tape up (or better yet seal with silicone) the bare connections

The post I got the information from suggested a heavy diode. I agree, to a point. The current that flows through this diode feeds 60w of lights. At 12V this means 5 amps flow though the diode. Therefore you need at least a 5 amp diode. I used two 3amp Schottky Barrier diodes in parallel (one beside the other). This is the equivalent of a single 6 amp diode. The diodes I used were part number 1N5822T. They cost 47 cents each. They should be readily available at any electronics supply store or Radio Shack.

With this arrangement the low position on the switch gives you the two lower lights (as it always did). The high position on the switch gives you all 3 lights at the same time.

This is a great mod for the Sportsman (or any 3 light Polaris). It is very easy to do, and inexpensive. I have done the mod to 1 '97, 2 '98's, and 1 '99. We don't have any battery drain problems with this arrangement.

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Hope this helps,

DJ
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  #10  
Old 06-21-2000, 10:09 PM
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I've used them several times. There is such a thing as a 12V 20 amp diode used in auto alternators. I get mine from an alternator rebuilding shop, in fact they usually give me the ones from old alternators. They work beautiful. I saved several sets of instructions to achieve different results, depending on your needs, if you want them.

http://www.GoDigital-Design.com/SchultzMotorsports
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Old 06-21-2000, 10:09 PM
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Tags
1, 12, 12v, 12v1, 20, 20amp, amp, auto, automotive, biasing, diod, diode, diodes, types, volt



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